The Villages Genealogical Society
Welcome to The Villages
Genealogical Society
Promoting and stimulating knowledge and interest
in the study of genealogy
"It's Another Beautiful Day in The Villages"
 
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May Monthly Meeting

May meeting pictures
175 members were in attendance as Jim & Terry Willard presented "Family Photos as a Clue to Genealogical Research."
Jim pointed out that every photo has 5 "W's; who, what, when, where and why associated with it. However, we may be missing some of that information. Often the name of a person is missing or when it was taken for example. Their tips offered ways to determine the missing pieces. Also, as you take pictures now, make sure you include the 5 "W's" for future generations.
Members can download a copy ot their suggestions. Log into "Members Only" and select "The Willards" in the Secure Download menu selection.

April 2015 General Meeting

Speaker & President
Although many find census lectures somewhat dry, this speaker approached the topic from a personal family history research angle. By the end of the presentation we felt that we knew the family members whose lives were being reconstructed. The audience interest level was quite high. Many positive comments were made after the session. VGS Past President Will Hoehendorf attended and commented on how much the VGS has evolved over the years. Considering that we were not meeting at our normal location and that there had been some confusion in the pre-meeting publicity, it turned out to be a highly successful meeting.

Admission to meetings of The Villages Genealogy Society are limited to VGS members at the discretion of the VGS Board of Directors.

COMING EVENTS
Monday, Jun. 8th
Family Tree Maker Users SIG Meeting
at 1:00 pm
Thursday, Jun. 11th
German Genealogy SIG Meeting
at 9:30 am
Friday, Jun. 12th
Genetic Genealogy SIG Meeting
at 10:00 am

FACTS
A person who dies "intestate" dies without a will.
When it comes to spelling variations, be creative. Often clerks and government officials were unable to correctly record the names given them by unschooled immigrants not familiar with languages used in their port of entry. The surname was written down as the official heard it and the immigrant accepted that as the official American rendering of his name.